Tree of Life Rug 7'1" x 5'1"

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Regular price $3,600.00 CAD
Price $7,200.00 CAD Special Price $3,600.00 CAD

CUSTOM SIZES AVAILABLE BY SPECIAL ORDER

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Sizes are approximate. Photos are not necessarily exact for color.

New rugs are of the highest quality and are handpicked overseas by the Bashir Family.

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Overview

The finishing of this carpet was done using centuries old traditional techniques. Once its laborious hand-knotting was completed, it was rolled and entirely submerged in a sanitizing bath where its fibers fully absorbed all cleaning liquid. After which it was laid flat on the ground where a team of cleaners used wooden "oar-like" paddles to push the water through its fibers and draw out impurities. Oar strokes were done in sync to prevent the carpet from getting torn. Each stroke tightened the knots even further. No machines were involved in its washing or drying.

Materials & Craftsmanship:

This diligently hand-knotted area rug is made of 80% pure lamb’s wool, 20% Pure Silk. Wool is a natural material, representing a healthy choice that is environmentally friendly with a long list of benefits. The pile of this wool rug is hygienic and non-allergenic, as the natural pile also deters the growth of bacteria and dust mites. It represents a great choice for asthma sufferers due to its natural filtering ability. The rug feels soft under the foot while remaining wear-resistant and long-lasting. With proper maintenance tailored to its needs, this rug can last over 75 years. Homeowners benefit from an extra grip which is important for balance, good posture, and accident prevention. Moreover, wool rugs are flame resistant. Cleaning is also easier due to a protective layer that pushes dirt up and resists staining. In fact, it will trap dirt and dust until it is vacuumed. A wool rug is also a great option for adding the look and feel of luxury to any space, as wool is a luxurious material.

The dyes used to produce this carpet are eco-friendly vegetable dyes that enrich the yarn with a natural and vibrant luster. Vegetable dyes are also referred to as natural dyes and are superior to "synthetic" dyes. In contrast to rugs woven with synthetic colors, this carpet will last for generations due to the high-quality materials and the skilled craftsmanship invested in it, bringing warmth and elegance to almost any space.

A Brief History of the Tree of Life Design

Tree of Life design in Oriental CarpetThe concept of a tree of life as a many-branched tree illustrating the idea that all life on earth is related has been used in science, religion, philosophy, mythology, and other fields including the art of carpet weaving for centuries. There has always been a great classical tradition of carpets depicting the Tree of Life. Since ancient times, this symbol in oriental carpets has represented the direct path from earth to heaven. It distinguishes itself from other carpet patterns in that it is based on one of the oldest and most universal of all religious and mythological symbols in human history.

References to a "Tree of Life" as the connecting link between the human and heavenly worlds are found in ancient cultures spanning throughout Europe, Asia Minor and the Orient. In fact, trees have always been important symbols in the religion of Jews, Christians, and Muslims. The Tree of Life is a mystical symbol used in the Kabbalah of esoteric Judaism to describe the path to God and the manner in which he created the world out of nothing. Kabbalists believe it to be a diagrammatic representation of the process by which the Universe came into being. It symbolises that point beyond which our comprehension of the origins of being cannot go. Kabbalists do not envision time and space as pre-existing, and place them at the next three stages on the Tree of Life.

The Tree of Life in the Book of Genesis is a tree planted by God in midst of the Garden of Eden, whose fruit gives everlasting life, i.e. immortality. Together with the Tree of Life, God planted the tree of the knowledge of good and evil (Genesis 2:9). In Islam, the Tree of Life symbolizes the bridge between Paradise, the world of men and the world below. It is usually used in conjunction with a garden, vase or prayer rug design.

In Baha'i Faith, it can refer to the Manifestation of God, a great teacher who appears to humanity from age to age. The concept can be broken down still further, with the Manifestation as the roots and trunk of the tree and his followers as the branches and leaves. The fruit produced by the tree nourishes an ever-advancing civilization. A distinction has been made between the Tree of Life and the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. The latter represents the physical world with its opposites, such as good and evil and light and dark. In a different context from the one above, the Tree of Life represents the spiritual realm, where this duality does not exist.

This symbol is also found in the Norse saga of the ash tree Yggdrasil, where the tree provides a magical spring water of knowledge. There is a similar mythology in China, where a carving of a Tree of Life depicts a bird and a dragon- in Chinese mythology, the dragon often represents immortality. Several workshop groups in Persia, Anatolia, India and Pakistan produce extremely intricate and naturalistic interpretations of the Tree of Life scheme. More stylized and geometric versions are found on a number of village and nomadic rugs from Persia, Anatolia and Afghanistan. It is also a popular field decoration on Belouch prayer rugs.

Today, the traditional Tree of Life design can be found blended with traditional Persian carpets such as Isfahans, Kirmans (Kermans), Qums, Semnans and Veramins.

Sources and inspiration: Bérinstain, Valérie, et al. L'art du tapis dans le monde (The art of carpets in the world). Paris: Mengès, 1996. Print.; Jerrehian Jr., Aram K.A. Oriental Rug Primer. Philadelphia: Running Press, 1980. Print.; Herbert, Janice Summers. Oriental Rugs, New York: Macmillan, 1982. Print.; Hackmack, Adolf. Chinese Carpets and Rugs, Rutland and Tokyo: Tuttle, 1980. Print. ; De Moubray, Amicia, and David Black. Carpets for the home, London: Laurence King Publishing, 1999. Print.; Jacobsen, Charles. Oriental Rugs A Complete Guide, Rutland and Tokyo: Tuttle, 1962. Print.; Bashir, S. (n.d.). Personal interview.; Web site sources and dates of consultation vary (to be confirmed). Without prejudice to official usage.