Paktia Lotus Gardens Carpet 11'7" x 8'11"

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Regular price $4,950.00 CAD
Price $9,900.00 CAD Special Price $4,950.00 CAD

CUSTOM SIZES AVAILABLE BY SPECIAL ORDER

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Sizes are approximate. Photos are not necessarily exact for color.

New rugs are of the highest quality and are handpicked overseas by the Bashir Family.

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Overview

The finishing of this carpet was done using centuries old traditional techniques. Once its laborious hand-knotting was completed, it was rolled and entirely submerged in a sanitizing bath where its fibers fully absorbed all cleaning liquid. After which it was laid flat on the ground where a team of cleaners used wooden oar-like paddles to push the water through its fibers and draw out impurities. Oar strokes were done in sync to prevent the carpet from getting torn. Each stroke tightened the knots even further. No machines were involved in its washing or drying.

Materials & Craftsmanship:
This diligently hand-knotted area rug is made of 100% pure lamb’s wool. Wool is a natural material, representing a healthy choice that is environmentally friendly with a long list of benefits. The pile of this wool rug is hygienic and non-allergenic, as the natural pile also deters the growth of bacteria and dust mites. It represents a great choice for asthma sufferers due to its natural filtering ability. The rug feels soft under the foot while remaining wear-resistant and long-lasting. With proper maintenance tailored to its needs, this rug can last over 75 years.

Homeowners benefit from an extra grip which is important for balance, good posture, and accident prevention. Moreover, wool rugs are flame resistant. Cleaning is also easier due to a protective layer that pushes dirt up and resists staining. In fact, it will trap dirt and dust until it is vacuumed. A wool rug is also a great option for adding the look and feel of luxury to any space, as wool is a luxurious material.

Symbolism behind the Lotus Flower

Lotus Flower Motifs on Oriental CarpetsLotus is native to Iran, India, China, Vietnam to Japan, Malaysia, New Guinea and Australia. It has been held sacred in Asia and the Middle East for over 5,000 years. It has been cultivated since early times, for religious and ornamental purposes. Lotus flowers have been used throughout history in South Asia and have been featured in Buddhist and Hindu art, carpets, textiles, architecture and literature. It was even a symbolically important plant before its use in religion as exemplified by the Indus Valley civilization.

The flowers became symbolic of immortality and resurrection because people observed that they would grow from the bottom of dried up pools after the monsoon rains. Despite its early use, it was Buddhism which first brought the lotus symbol to widespread use. Lotus medallions are prominent on the Buddhist places of worship at Sanchi in Madhaya Pradesh and Amaravati in Andhra Pradesh dating from the 2nd century BC to the 2nd century AD. As Buddhism spread from India to Central Asia and China in the first few centuries AD, and lotus flowers were used to represent Buddha. They were featured on rosettes, scrolls, motifs and iconography.

The giant leaves of lotus plants were used as plates in ancient India, and its seeds and roots are still considered a delicacy. Texts from the 11th and 12th centuries noted lotus dishes and feasts in which their leaves were consumed. The lotus became a common feature woven into South Asia's culture. This continued with the advent of Islam in the 12th century AD. Lotus flowers had ancient connections with Persian culture, so they were already popular motifs on Islamic carpets, textiles and architecture. They feature in intricate patterns on perforated screens, tiles and ceramics.

Sources and inspiration: Bérinstain, Valérie, et al. L'art du tapis dans le monde (The art of carpets in the world). Paris: Mengès, 1996. Print.; Jerrehian Jr., Aram K.A. Oriental Rug Primer. Philadelphia: Running Press, 1980. Print.; Herbert, Janice Summers. Oriental Rugs, New York: Macmillan, 1982. Print.; Hackmack, Adolf. Chinese Carpets and Rugs, Rutland and Tokyo: Tuttle, 1980. Print. ; De Moubray, Amicia, and David Black. Carpets for the home, London: Laurence King Publishing, 1999. Print.; Jacobsen, Charles. Oriental Rugs A Complete Guide, Rutland and Tokyo: Tuttle, 1962. Print.; Bashir, S. (n.d.). Personal interview.; Web site sources and dates of consultation vary (to be confirmed). Without prejudice to official usage.