Caucasian Wool Rug 6'3" x 5'

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Regular price $2,700.00 CAD
Price $5,400.00 CAD Special Price $2,700.00 CAD

CUSTOM SIZES AVAILABLE BY SPECIAL ORDER

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Sizes are approximate. Photos are not necessarily exact for color.

New rugs are of the highest quality and are handpicked overseas by the Bashir Family.

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Overview

Materials & Craftsmanship:

This diligently hand-knotted area rug is made of 100% pure lamb’s wool. Wool is a natural material, representing a healthy choice that is environmentally friendly with a long list of benefits. The pile of this wool rug is hygienic and non-allergenic, as the natural pile also deters the growth of bacteria and dust mites. It represents a great choice for asthma sufferers due to its natural filtering ability. The rug feels soft under the foot while remaining wear-resistant and long-lasting. With proper maintenance tailored to its needs, this rug can last over 75 years. Homeowners benefit from an extra grip which is important for balance, good posture, and accident prevention. Moreover, wool rugs are flame resistant. Cleaning is also easier due to a protective layer that pushes dirt up and resists staining. In fact, it will trap dirt and dust until it is vacuumed. A wool rug is also a great option for adding the look and feel of luxury to any space, as wool in itself is a luxurious material.

The dyes used to produce this carpet are eco-friendly vegetable dyes that enrich the yarn with a natural and vibrant luster. Vegetable dyes are also referred to as natural dyes and are superior to "synthetic" dyes. In contrast to rugs woven with synthetic colors, this carpet will last for generations due to the high-quality materials and the skilled craftsmanship invested in it, bringing warmth and elegance to almost any space.

A Brief History of Caucasian Rugs

Differing from other rug types, Caucasian rugs are primarily produced as village productions rather than city pieces. Made from materials particular to individual tribal provinces, the rugs of the Caucasus normally display bold geometric designs in primary colors. Styles typical to the Caucasus region are Daghestan, Shirvan, Kazak and Kuba rugs. The Caucasus is a geopolitical region at the border of Europe and Asia which encompasses: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Russia and Turkey. It is home to the Caucasus Mountains, including Europe's highest mountain: Mount Elbrus. The collapse of the Soviet Union and the consequent liberation of communication and trade links between the west and the newly independent Caucasian republics have resulted in the release onto the market of previously little-known traditional "heirloom" items, particularly flat woven covers.

Caucasian carpets are made with symmetrical, Turkish or Ghiordes knots. Contrary to popular belief, Kazak carpets are not necessarily from Kazakhstan but are from an area which is now Armenia. Older Caucasian Rugs and their colors are mostly made from natural materials found in tribal regions. They are generally 100% wool pile including those that are made up of warp and weft threads which are usually made from hand spun woolen yarn or goat hair.

On occasion, one can find older carpets with cotton warps and wefts. Warp threads may be made of undyed light yarn in one area and dark or mixed yarn in another area. Goat hair is applied to the warp threads, but never for the pile. Weft threads are made of various colors such as: rust red, brown, blue or white. The number and colors of selvages indicate the tribal region from which the carpet pertains.

Sources and inspiration: Bérinstain, Valérie, et al. L'art du tapis dans le monde (The art of carpets in the world). Paris: Mengès, 1996. Print.; Jerrehian Jr., Aram K.A. Oriental Rug Primer. Philadelphia: Running Press, 1980. Print.; Herbert, Janice Summers. Oriental Rugs, New York: Macmillan, 1982. Print.; Hackmack, Adolf. Chinese Carpets and Rugs, Rutland and Tokyo: Tuttle, 1980. Print. ; De Moubray, Amicia, and David Black. Carpets for the home, London: Laurence King Publishing, 1999. Print.; Jacobsen, Charles. Oriental Rugs A Complete Guide, Rutland and Tokyo: Tuttle, 1962. Print.; Bashir, S. (n.d.). Personal interview.; Web site sources and dates of consultation vary (to be confirmed). Without prejudice to official usage.